Sadik Nuka is transforming a run-down house into a home

The CWS Durable Housing Solutions for Permanent Integration project helps refugees and internally displaced persons solve their housing problems and helps the families fully integrate into local communities. The project is currently assisting eight families displaced from Kosovo.

Sadik Nuka's kitchen renovation - before
Sadik Nuka's kitchen renovation,  before (above) and after (below).
Photos: CWS
Sadik Nuka's kitchen renovation - after

The CWS Durable Housing Solutions for Permanent Integration project helps refugees and internally displaced persons solve their housing problems and helps the families fully integrate into local communities. The project is currently assisting eight families displaced from Kosovo.

The families typically build or reconstruct simple houses on their own, on land they have acquired. They work hard to meet daily needs and often are not able to afford to finish their homes adequately. Modest grants are awarded to the families, according to established criteria, with a maximum grant of $2,000. By building homes in Vojvodina, the refugees also secure their basic food needs: It is an agricultural area and every house has a garden or the family can rent land to farm.

Sadik Nuka's family of six was displaced from the village of Nevoljane, in Kosovo, and currently lives in the Roma settlement of Adice, in Novi Sad, Serbia. With the help of his extended family, they purchased an old, crumbling house. The house had only one livable room. The other rooms had not been completed, and the bathroom was completely unusable. All of the family members were sleeping in one room. They were in dire need of construction materials for the bathroom, getting electricity to all of the rooms, construction, carpentry and some other jobs that would make this house livable. They couldn't afford to save money for reconstruction because they do not have permanent employment. Meliha, the wife, is not able to do heavy work because she has had four hernia surgeries.  The family lives on income from seasonal jobs that Sadik manages to get.

The improvements made possible by the construction grant will change their lives. They will be able to live in healthy and hygienic conditions. The children will have their own separate room, a place to study and rest. The money that Sadik makes will now be spent primarily on food and other things that are necessary for the children.

Media Contact:
Lesley Crosson, 212-870-2676, lcrosson@churchworldservice.org
Jan Dragin, 781-925-1526, jdragin@gis.net


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